Our Solution

Sea Life Rescue has developed a ground-breaking technology enabling in situ ocean breeding of wild marine life.

Rejuvenation

Restocking the oceans by increasing fertilization.

Action

Creating awareness and joining concerned citizens.

Technology​

Innovations in catching and breeding sea life. 

Project - Rescue One

Deployment of scalable modular equipment on special ships strategically dispatched around the globe to resolve critical biodiversity and humanitarian issues.

Strategy Planning

Deployment of scalable modular equipment on special ships strategically dispatched around the globe to resolve critical biodiversity and humanitarian issues.

Vessel Operations

No Chemicals

No Pollution

No Waste

Sustainable

Mission Planning

Sea Life Rescue utilizes an in-house screening model to maximize environmental and social impact, reduce operational risk, and identify the critical paths in successful marine life rejuvenation.

1. Environmental Situation

Pollution levels, water quality, local biodiversity abundance, coral reef's health.

2. Marine

Species

Aquatic ecosystem health, invasive species determination & possible resolution, IUCN threat list assessment.

3. Local Communities

Fishing practices, economy, poverty levels, government & regulatory environment.

4. Operational Efficiency

Species culture techniques, multi-species spawning, effective catch and release, universities and industry partnerships.

5. Navigation Planning

Multi-locations species breeding behavior calendar, fuel consumption, climate effects, annual maintenance and replenishment.

6. Impact Measurement

Quantitative analyses, DNA sampling, local community support (seafood supply and employment), Ph.D. scholarships.

Global Rejuvenation

FISH SPECIES

Based on the IUCN (International Union of Conservation for Nature) Red List of endangered species and using proven aquaculture breeding techniques.

Click / Hover on Species Zones!
Endangered Fish Populations
Nassau Grouper Giant Sea Bass Atlantic Halibut Humphead Wrasse Goliath Grouper Hongkong Grouper Atlantic Cod Dusky Grouper

Nassau Grouper

IUCN STATUS

CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

  • Known predator of the LIONFISH.
  • 95% Population decline.
  • Sexual Maturity at 4 years.
  • 500,000 to 3,000,000 eggs.
  • Spawns November through April.
  • Proven aquaculture production.
  • Known spawning locations.
  • Occurs in Marine Protected Areas.

Giant Sea Bass

IUCN STATUS

CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

  • 95% Population decline.
  • Sexual Maturity at 11 years.
  • 60,000,000 eggs per spawning.
  • Spawns July through September.
  • Proven aquaculture production.
  • Known spawning locations.
  • Occurs in Marine Protected Areas.

Atlantic Halibut

IUCN STATUS

ENDANGERED

  • 90% Population decline.
  • Sexual Maturity at 8 years.
  • 3,500,000 eggs.
  • Spawns April through September.
  • Proven aquaculture production.
  • Known spawning locations.
  • Occur's in Marine Protected Areas.

Humphead Wrasse

IUCN STATUS

ENDANGERED

  • Known predator of the Crown of Thorns Starfish.
  • 90% Population decline.
  • Sexual Maturity at 5 years.
  • 3,000,000 eggs per spawning.
  • Spawns all year round.
  • Proven aquaculture production.
  • Known spawning locations.
  • Occurs in Marine Protected Areas.

Goliath Grouper

IUCN STATUS

ENDANGERED

  • 84% Population decline.
  • Sexual Maturity at 6 years.
  • 60,000,000 eggs per spawning.
  • Spawns July through August.
  • Proven aquaculture production.
  • Known spawning locations.
  • Occurs in Marine Protected Areas.

Hongkong Grouper

IUCN STATUS

ENDANGERED

  • 90% Population decline.
  • Sexual Maturity at 3 years.
  • 500,000 to 3,500,000 eggs.
  • Spawns July through August.
  • Proven aquaculture production.
  • Known spawning locations.
  • Occurs in Marine Protected Areas.

Atlantic Cod

IUCN STATUS

VULNERABLE

  • 75% Population decline.
  • Sexual Maturity at 4 years.
  • 2,500,000 to 15,000,000 eggs.
  • Spawns December through April.
  • Proven aquaculture production.
  • Known spawning locations.
  • Occurs in Marine Protected Areas.

Dusky Grouper

IUCN STATUS

VULNERABLE

  • 88% Population decline.
  • Sexual Maturity at 5 years.
  • 500,000 to 3,500,000 eggs.
  • Spawns July through December.
  • Proven aquaculture production.
  • Known spawning locations.
  • Occurs in Marine Protected Areas.

Global Dead Zones

Global Ocean Oxygen Network

Based on the finding of UNESCO’s Global Ocean Oxygen Network (GO2NE), related to deoxygenation of open ocean and coastal waters.

Click / Hover on Dead Zones!

Dead Zones
Coastal Zones Coastal Zones Ocean Zone Ocean Zone Ocean Zone Costal Zone Coastal Zone Coastal Zone

Coastal Zones

Millennium Ecosystem Assessment released by the United Nations in 2005 reported that the supply of nitrogen-containing compounds input to the world's oceans grew by 80 percent from 1860 to 1990. For individual coastal water bodies, the increase has been as high as 100 fold or more.

Coastal Zones

The Baltic Sea has one of the largest coastal water hypoxic zones in the world. In 2011 the area of water with dissolved oxygen concentration <2 mg/L was nearly 80,000 km2.

Ocean Zone

The use of synthetic fertilizers for the cultivation of nitrogen‐fixing crops and increased emissions of NOX have all contributed to soaring levels of reactive nitrogen in the environment.

Ocean Zone

Upwelling of low oxygen water can cause massive fish kills but also brings nutrient-rich waters to the surface to fuel fisheries production.

Ocean Zone

Costal Zone

Over 500 coastal water bodies now report dissolved oxygen concentrations below 2mg/L

Coastal Zone

Coastal Zone

Wastewater from sewage and agriculture adds excess phosphates and nitrogen which stimulate blooms of noxious and toxic algae in coastal ecosystems.

Excess algae growth decomposes with aerobic bacteria causing hypoxic (oxygen-depleted) Dead Zones leading to eutrophication causing animals to die.

Dead Zones result in biodiversity collapse, major economic losses for coastal fishing industries, and release of (NOX) nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas 300x more powerful than CO2.

Dead Zones can be prevented by rejuvenating the natural filter-feeding bivalves which consume the algae blooms, improving water clarity and reducing nutrients preventing oxygen-deficient dead zones from forming along coastal regions, as well as providing a sustainable benefit to the fishing industry.

SHELLFISH SPECIES

OYSTER

Filters 50 Gal / Day
Global distribution
yearly release
200 million eggs

SCALLOP

Filters 93 Gal / Day
Global distribution
yearly release
100 million eggs

CLAM

Filters 20 Gal / Day
Global distribution
yearly release
10 million eggs

MUSSEL

Filters 15 Gal / Day
Global distribution
yearly release
1 million eggs

Our Technology